Dale Kerns Speech – Addiction is Not a Crime Tour – Newtown, PA

U.S. Senate candidate Dale Kerns is traveling the state to promote his bill entitled “Addiction is Not a Crime.” This is the full audio from his speech on January 27 in Newtown, PA.


In Kerns’ bill, he lays out four specific points which will work toward ending the War on Drugs in Pennsylvania:

1. Abolish the use of for-profit prisons in the state;
2. Remove the FDA and any other lobbyists from the treatment process;
3. End mandatory minimum sentences for non-violent offenders;
4. Use free market approaches to educate & assist those currently victimized by the system.

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Dale Kerns “Addiction is Not a Crime” Tour to Stop in Newtown

This Saturday, U.S. Senate candidate Dale Kerns will make his second stop on his tour across the state to promote his “Addiction is Not a Crime” bill.

The Senate candidate will deliver a speech this Saturday, January 27th at Bucks County Community College in Newtown at 1:00PM. Visit the Dale Kerns’ Campaign website for more details about this free event.

Two weeks ago Kerns kicked off his tour in  Wilkes-Barre and his voyage will lead him to several other cities throughout Pennsylvania, including Allentown, Lebanon, Johnstown, York, Altoona, Harrisburg, Erie, Bethlehem, Pittsburgh, Scranton, Leesport and West Chester.

The issue of drug treatment is one which hits close to home for Kerns. His cousin, Dan, passed away in 2015 after battling addiction. As the candidate stated in a heartfelt Facebook post, Dan’s death had as much to do with the War on Drugs as it did the drugs themselves:

Dan was thrown in jail, not treated properly, and given heroin while incarcerated at a for-profit prison in Delaware County Pa. The prison system we had hoped would help, is not a solution to the addiction problems in Pennsylvania.

The drug epidemic has expanded and affected Pennsylvania particularly harshly. Nearly 80% of counties in the state have fatal overdose rates which exceed the national average.

The national numbers paint an even harsher reality which reinforces the harm done when bureaucrats care more about punishment than rehabilitation. Over the last 40 years, the United States government has spent over $1 trillion in taxpayer funds attempting to fight drug addiction with punishment. However, the federal prison population has increased by nearly 800%.

In Kerns’ bill, he lays out four specific points which will work toward ending the War on Drugs in Pennsylvania:

Abolish the use of for-profit prisons in the state;
Remove the FDA and any other lobbyists from the treatment process;
End mandatory minimum sentences for non-violent offenders;
Use free market approaches to educate & assist those currently victimized by the system.
In November, Kerns penned a letter to President Trump detailing the failures of the War on Drugs and outlining his plan. During his appearances, Kerns will expound upon his proposal. More details about the tour and Dale’s campaign can be found at DaleKerns.com.

Drew Miller Backs Kerns on “Addiction is Not a Crime”

U.S. House and Senate Candidates Combine to Battle Drug Issue

Earlier this month, the Libertarian Party nominated Drew Gray Miller to compete in March’s special election for Pennsylvania’s 18th Congressional District. The newly-christened nominee announced today that he is committed to U.S. Senate candidate Dale Kerns’ “Addiction is Not a Crime” proposal.

In Kerns’ bill, he lays out four specific points which will work toward ending the War on Drugs in Pennsylvania:

  1. Abolish the use of for-profit prisons in the state;
  2. Remove the FDA and any other lobbyists from the treatment process;
  3. End mandatory minimum sentences for non-violent offenders;
  4. Use free market approaches to educate & assist those currently victimized by the system.

“The opioid epidemic has affected far too many families in Greene, Washington, Allegheny, and Westmoreland County,” said Miller. “Drug abuse is a public health issue, not a criminal one, and the best way to treat the epidemic is with care and compassion, not incarceration.”

Kerns said of Miller’s commitment, “I am glad to have Drew’s hand in this worthy fight against addiction and for its victims. I look forward to working alongside him in the U.S. Congress.”

The drug epidemic has expanded and affected Pennsylvania particularly harshly. Nearly 80% of counties in the state have fatal overdose rates which exceed the national average.

The national numbers paint an even harsher reality which reinforces the harm done when bureaucrats care more about punishment than rehabilitation. Over the last 40 years, the United States government has spent over $1 trillion in taxpayer funds attempting to fight drug addiction with punishment. However, the federal prison population has increased by nearly 800%.

Throughout the coming months, Kerns will be touring the state, promoting his bill. His first date was earlier this month in Wilkes-Barre, and he plans to take his message to Newtown, Allentown, Lebanon, Johnstown, York, Altoona, Harrisburg, Erie, Bethlehem, Pittsburgh, Scranton, Leesport, and West Chester.

Dale Kerns Launches “Addiction is Not a Crime” Tour

Beginning this month, U.S. Senate candidate Dale Kerns will travel across the state to promote his bill entitled “Addiction is Not a Crime.” He begins his journey with a speech this Saturday, January 13 at King’s College in Wilkes-Barre at 1:00PM. Kerns’ voyage will lead him to twelve other cities throughout Pennsylvania, including Newtown, Allentown, Lebanon, Johnstown, York, Altoona, Harrisburg, Erie, Bethlehem, Pittsburgh, Scranton, and Leesport.

The issue of drug treatment is one which hits close to home for Kerns. His cousin, Dan, passed away in 2015 after battling addiction. As the candidate stated in a heartfelt Facebook post, Dan’s death had as much to do with the War on Drugs as it did the drugs themselves:

Dan was thrown in jail, not treated properly, and given heroin while incarcerated at a for-profit prison in Delaware County Pa. The prison system we had hoped would help, is not a solution to the addiction problems in Pennsylvania.

The drug epidemic has expanded and affected Pennsylvania particularly harshly. Nearly 80% of counties in the state have fatal overdose rates which exceed the national average.

The national numbers paint an even harsher reality which reinforces the harm done when bureaucrats care more about punishment than rehabilitation. Over the last 40 years, the United States government has spent over $1 trillion in taxpayer funds attempting to fight drug addiction with punishment. However, the federal prison population has increased by nearly 800%.

In Kerns’ bill, he lays out four specific points which will work toward ending the War on Drugs in Pennsylvania:

  1. Abolish the use of for-profit prisons in the state;
  2. Remove the FDA and any other lobbyists from the treatment process;
  3. End mandatory minimum sentences for non-violent offenders;
  4. Use free market approaches to educate & assist those currently victimized by the system.

In November, Kerns penned a letter to President Trump detailing the failures of the War on Drugs and outlining his plan. During his appearances, Kerns will expound upon his proposal. More details about the tour and Dale’s campaign can be found at DaleKerns.com.

Open Letter to Donald Trump: New Direction Needed in War on Drug Addiction

By Dale R. Kerns Jr.

A few weeks ago, you addressed the opioid epidemic, which has gripped the country in recent years. In officially declaring the opioid crisis a national public health emergency, you took the important first step toward fixing this problem.

However, even more important is how we move forward in operating in the midst of this emergency. We have already tried treating the issue as a criminal one. Over the last 40 years, our nation has spent well over $1 trillion in taxpayer dollars on the War on Drugs as our federal prison population has increased by nearly 800 percent.

If one wishes to know the effectiveness of these policies, they need only learn that in spite of these strong steps, the United States remains the number 1 country in the world in illegal drug use.

With this “tough on crime” approach clearly failing, an alternative has emerged to treat drug users not as criminals, but rather as human beings. In Portugal they decided to take this path less traveled in 2001. Once ravaged by chaos and disarray due to the drug trade, the country’s incidences of use and addiction has plummeted. Overdose deaths of adults are now the second lowest in the entire European Union, with 3 annually for every 1 million citizens.

Switzerland has embraced medical treatment for heroin addicts. The Swiss have experienced incredible results with their heroin-assisted treatment program, which began in 1994. The Swiss treat roughly 1,300 addicts with maintenance doses of heroin via more than 20 clinics. Perhaps the most incredible statistic, since the program’s inception there has not been a single occurrence of overdose in any of the clinics.

My own family has had a brush with the real-world ramifications of the failures of the current War on Drugs. Two years ago, we lost my cousin Dan. He had been a drug user, and when he needed help the most, the government extended not a helping hand, but an iron fist. Thrown in jail, he never got the necessary treatment to help him kick his addiction.

Addiction is not a crime, and it shouldn’t be treated like one. If my family had been given the opportunity to help Dan, things could have turned out differently. It may be too late for him, but it is not too late to help the millions like him who suffer every day from the current Drug War.

In 1990, one leading business voice eloquently explained a path to winning the War on Drugs. He asserted, “You have to take the profit away from these drug czars.” That same business leader stated that by taking the drug trade out of the shadows, profits could then be used to educate the public about the “dangers of drugs,” rather than wasting that money on incarceration.

Mr. President, do you remember speaking these words? Your words could not have been more right then, and now you have the opportunity to prove yourself correct and enact this policy 27 years later. By taking the steps I’ve outlined in my “Addiction is Not a Crime” bill, I’m confident that we can work together to bring an end to the scourges that are drug addiction and the War on Drugs.

Dale R. Kerns Jr. is the head of Delaware County’s Libertarian Party and a Libertarian candidate for U.S. Senate